Editor'S Choice

Northeast Blackout

Northeast Blackout

A major outage knocked out power across the eastern United States and parts of Canada on August 14, 2003. ET, 21 power plants shut down in just three minutes. Fifty million people were affected, including residents of New York, Cleveland and Detroit, as well as Toronto and Ottawa, Canada. Although power companies were able to resume some service in as little as two hours, power remained off in other places for more than a day.

USS Wood (DD-317)

USS Wood (DD-317)

USS Wood (DD-317) USS Wood (DD-317) was a Clemson class destroyer that served with the Pacific Fleet in the 1920s before being scrapped because of her badly worn boilers.The Wood was named after William Maxwell Wood, the first Navy Surgeon-General (1809–1880)The Wood was laid down by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corp at San Francisco on 23 January 1919 and launched on 28 May 1919 when she was sponsored by Wood’s grand-daughter, Mrs George Kirkland Smith.

A History of Nursing Heroes from Florence Nightingale to Coronavirus

A History of Nursing Heroes from Florence Nightingale to Coronavirus

Nurses are heroes of the COVID-19 crisis. May 12 is International Nurses Day, which commemorates the birthday of Florence Nightingale, the first “professional nurse.”

Exhibition

Exhibition "The Cyrus Cylinder in ancient Persia"

The Cyrus Cylinder is a cylindrical piece of clay that contains what could be considered the first declaration of human rights, its origins date back to when the Persian king Cyrus the Great had Babylon in his possession in the 6th century BC last Saturday. this object, which continues its presence 2.

Tolstoy's view of history

Tolstoy's view of history

Tolstoy's view of history as propounded in his book "War and Peace" is that the forces that shape historical events are infinitely many and unknowable. He posits that a leader is in no ways more sp…

Pendle's witchcraft trial

Pendle's witchcraft trial

Since ancient times, and especially since the appearance of the Holy Inquisition, in Europe supposed witches and people accused of performing magic or witchcraft have been persecuted. The case of Salem in America is well known, but the Europeans are not so well known. One of the most notorious episodes in Europe is that of the witchcraft trials in Pendle, Lanchashire, England, which took place during the 17th century.